Ramon Todo

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Born in Tokyo. Using stones and bricks with history and culture of the land, he creats the sculpture of the stones put in polished glasses. Coming and going from Japan to Dusseldorf, he is actively engaged in creating. Living in Dusseldorf.
1969 born in Tokyo, 1997 MFA in Sculpture, Tama Art University, 1999 Academy of Fine Arts Dusseldorf, 2003 Meisterschueler of Professor Daniel Buren. Artist’s name changed from “Ramon Todo” to “TODO”. -Art Front Gallery

To see more from Ramon Todo click here.

Catherine Story

Catherine Story

Catherine Story

The work of Catherine Story.

**All images are from www.carlfreedman.com

Now Featuring Agustina Mihura

Argentine artist Agustina Mihura pays close attention to the processes and materiality of nature, in a practice that is both intuitive and research-based.  The unfolding details in her work mirror the transformations of the natural world, from the tiny scale of cellular growth to the slow shifts of geologic time.

Exclusive Print 1, Stone 1

Exclusive Print 1, Stone

Exclusive Print 2, Ribbon

Exclusive Print 2, Ribbon

Exclusive Print 3, Stone

Exclusive Print 3, Stone

Exclusive Print 4, Stone

Exclusive Print 4, Stone

Exclusive Print 5, Bent Squares

Exclusive Print 5, Bent Squares

MH: How do you draw threads across your practice to connect your various projects, from sculpture to installation to drawing/collage?

AM: My practice is constantly moving from one point to another. For that reason, I may change the media in the process. I think contemporary artists should wonder about our own practices all the time, and never be satisfied with just one idea or one way of doing things. In my case I have some works that start from the encounter with a particular material that leads to the concept. But in other cases, it is the idea (maybe just a word or a mental image) that materializes in a particular form. I feel comfortable moving from three dimensional space to paper because there is something about switching that I find challenging. Every time I´m working on the  two dimensional world I get new ideas to work in the space and vice versa.

Taller-Agus

MH: What is your day to day practice like?

AM: My works doesn’t develop only at my studio; it starts much earlier in other spaces. I try to spend time just contemplating my environment, walking around my city Buenos Aires, in nature, traveling; I get inspired listening music, or even doing banal things like arranging my studio, my home or even cooking. Then at some point, I come back enthusiastic to the studio with a bunch of new ideas to work on them. My practice in the studio has more to do with trial and error; I never know clearly how some works going to look at the end but it’s in the process, in baby steps, when everything happens. All the decisions I make, in that stage, lead the work to one direction and finally the piece comes up.

Studio Stuff

MH: What are some of your favorite materials to work with?

AM: Even If I work with every kind of materials, I still love traditional and simple ones, like paper, clay, wood, color pencils and pigments. I think what I like most in each of them is that we can use them for create complex works even though they are so simple.

MH: Your titles and forms evoke natural materials and processes, so how do you select studio materials?

AM: I choose a material for several reasons, probably the first one is their texture, how it feels in my hands, ductility is another quality that I like in a material. I like things that can be transformed easily in something else. Brightness, color, opacity, and all the qualities related to the surface are also important. Often I buy or collect things that I have no idea what I want to do with it but I just want it in my studio, just an intuition. At the same time I work a lot with photography for research, and I take photos of materials that I see in the streets just to remember that I like them. Also I like to create contrasts in between materials, often the way I choose a new material its related to the one I used before.

Studio Practice

MH: You recently did a residency at the Vermont Studio Center. What did you work on there? How did the residency influence the direction your practice is taking?

AM: I was there for two months in autumn with a fellowship for Latin American artists. The residency is located in a small town; there are no distractions and the only people you see every day are other artists.  The proximity to nature was wonderful. All of the works that I developed there were related to this new environment; the colors and the landscape there really affected my works. At that time I was reading Autumnal Tints, from H.D. Thoreau and that was a really good match. Vermont was my third experience in artist residencies abroad, each was very different and successful in their own way, but I think Vermont was really a breakthrough point in my work.

Studio 1

MH: How much of your interest in the natural world is also rooted in abstraction?

AM: For me, nature and abstraction are totally related. On one hand I believe that everything in nature can be reduced to the simplest and basic forms, and the combinations of all of them compose nature itself. As an astronomer for instance can reduce a galaxy at an spiral shape, at the same time you can find a whole universe in a simple leaf, that passage from complex to simple that goes in the other way too. Some of my works are inspired by nature but I don’t think that I try to copy, I just want to create a new synthetic version in our own human scale.

Stones

MH: Do you have a research process, for example into geology or natural history that you use as part of your studio process?

AH: Yes of course, when I’m working with some of my pieces, they happen to remind me of  something in the natural world, so at that point I research and read a lot about it. At the moment you start to read about something, a lot of unconscious choices you made during the process start to have a new meaning and you can re-direct the work into another direction. I like to think in the process of production like something open and organic, I want to feel free for going forward and backwards several times, from the concept to the form and the form to the concept.

Geology for instance, really obsesses me these days. Not only because I´m using that imagery on my work, what fascinates me about geology is the idea that everything on earth is made of fluids, sediments and time, a lot of time.

Studio Materials 1

MH: What are you working on now?

AM: Nowadays I’m working in my next solo show “SIMIL,” in October. I’m doing these new pieces, the whole concept of the show is around the idea of fake nature. At the same time I’m working on video and photography about the perception of time related to the changes in nature. For those, even though I have some clear ideas, I am still finding my way through it.

Detail 2

Objects & Rachel Howe

We at Little Paper Planes have a passion for the objects around us, whether they are made, bought or given.  Humans create relationships with the things they own, and these things are often markers of a particular time in ones’ life.  They represent moments, people and/or places.  There is an inherent aura within an object andonce in our procession we create the meaning for it.  Our homes become filled of things,which  in some regards can seem indulgent or frivolous, however these things hold the emotional weight of our daily lives.  Whether they are utilitarian or art they  become the physical framework for a unique, personal narrative.

Creative people have a special relationship with things since we are the makers of them. Within this ongoing series, we ask the artists, designers and makers we work with to share stories about the objects they are surrounded by in order to examine their power and the memories associated with them.

ob-1-blog ob-2-blog

 

Interview #1

 

Name/location/what do you do:

Rachel Howe, Brooklyn NY, I make ceramics as Small Spells

 

In a few words, what is your relationship with objects and how do you view things both personally and within in our society?

My relationship with objects has been changing recently, actually towards owning less and less things, even as I am making more and more things. I value experience more than material things, although I do love design, and art…but now when I see an object I desire, I less want to own it and am more about feeling the visual pleasure, filing it away in my brain, and moving on. I think visual appreciation has definitely been manipulated by society to create a void that can be filled by buying more stuff, instead of it being inspiring and stimulating for individual creation. I’m always for more individual creation instead of consumerism, though there is something very special about owning an object made by someone skilled and creative, and of course I depend on people wanting to own things I made.

 

Do you have something you always take with you when you move? Something you could never throw away?

My relationship with objects has been changing recently, actually towards owning less and less things, even as I am making more and more things. I value experience more than material things, although I do love design, and art…but now when I see an object I desire, I less want to own it and am more about feeling the visual pleasure, filing it away in my brain, and moving on. I think visual appreciation has definitely been manipulated by society to create a void that can be filled by buying more stuff, instead of it being inspiring and stimulating for individual creation. I’m always for more individual creation instead of consumerism, though there is something very special about owning an object made by someone skilled and creative, and of course I depend on people wanting to own things I made.

 

What is a object that currently resonates for you? 

One thing I always love is when objects are personalized, especially if it reflects a certain style or trend of a certain time. I got these bookends at a flea market a while ago, and they seem to be regular metal library bookends that have been cut out and hand-painted. I did some research, and the 66th division was active in WWII, and was nicknamed the “Black Panther Division,” for their aggressiveness. So the year of 1981 actually holds another layer of nostalgia: if that’s when it was made, it was much later in the maker’s life, and commemorates a loaded memory from decades earlier. And the Black Panther motif alludes, although unintentionally, to the civil rights movement. So this one customized object holds reference to events from the 40s, 60s, and 80s, which is pretty impressive.

 

To learn more about Rachel and Small Spells ceramics, click here.  

David Korty

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David Korty (b. San Francisco, CA, 1971) received his MFA from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1999, and his BFA from RISD, in Providence, RI, in 1992. He has shown extensively in Los Angeles, with solo exhibitions at such venues as Night Gallery, China Art Objects, Michael Kohn, and LAXART, at Greene Naftali in New York, and at Sadie Coles HQ in London. Korty’s work has been acquired by the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, the Grunwald Center for Graphic Arts, Los Angeles, and the Judith Rothschild Foundation. He lives and works in Los Angeles. -Night Gallery

To see more from David Korty click here, here, and here.

Clive Murphy

Clive Murphy

Clive Murphy

Based in New York, Irish artist Clive Murphy’s practice draws from the peripheries of visual culture. Mining diverse sources he utilizes the formal properties of the commonplace to produce works that create a junction of societal and cultural phenomenon.

He appropriates and reconfigures familiar signifiers in order to explore their wider cultural resonance, uncovering new ground for the proliferation of diverse meanings.

Murphy’s work concerns itself with both site and surface – not only the position of the individual within an increasingly ‘mass’ oriented environment but also the contours, the landscapes through which this environing is revealed.

Exploring themes of hierarchy, inter-relationality and meaning formation, he infiltrates sites of visual signification with a combination of pathos and incongruity, reconstituting ideological, cultural and rhetorical systems in an effort to situate a new sense of human space.

**All images and text are from clivemurphyart.com

69 Worldwide

69 us

69 is a non-gender, non-demographic clothing line. All products and garments are manufactured in Los Angeles, California.  69 is timeless and classic yet made in our present and meant for the future.

To see more from 69 and to shop the current collection, click here.

Helen Marten

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“With an innovative perspective on norms and boundaries set by the present-day idea of habitat, Helen Marten produces a series of assemblage sculptures that recall standardised domestic environments. The sculptures, balancing between the notions of familiar household objects and the physicality of human forms, challenge the viewer to re-think the idea of the model as an essential tool of organization… Oreo St. James might just be a parallel realm or imaginary location where brand names and objects dissolve in Marten’s monumental sculptural pieces and psychedelic paintings.” -Marina Maniadaki

To see more from Helen Marten click here.

Luke Shalan

Luke Shalan is an artist/process designer working in Los Angeles, CA. His work focuses on exploring the interactions between tool, material and creator/operator, questioning modern forms of production, and emphasizing creative, performative processes.

“Through a process-based practice, I investigate the relationship developed between maker, tools and materials. I work in tandem with contraptions I create, manipulating slabs of porcelain. The contraptions I have developed are inspired by porcelain’s properties. Through a performative investigation of these properties, I seek to uncover the moments in which the inventive nature of a tool creates a dialogue between itself, the material and the maker. This is shown through video and photographic documentation. The artifacts I produce are records of the porcelain’s reaction to the process. They also articulate a sense of individual connection to the things we use on a day-to-day basis. I drop slabs of clay over a variety of objects, primarily being hand tools and domestic objects such as a place settings and picture frames. The final artifacts record these object’s shapes with astonishing fidelity, but are subtle in their presence.”

 

Porcelain Slab Dropping Backpack

Porcelain Slab Dropping Backpack

 

 

Large Slab Dropping Contraception

Large Slab Dropping Contraception

 

 

Original Slab Dropping Device

Original Slab Dropping Device

 

Video stills from Drop 32, Table Setting (0:02:01)

Video stills from Drop 32, Table Setting (0:02:01)

 

 

Garden Shears Porcelain and enamel

Garden Shears
Porcelain and enamel

 

 

Assorted Tools Porcelain

Assorted Tools
Porcelain

 

 

 

Assorted Archival Slabs Porcelain, wax and paper

Assorted Archival Slabs
Porcelain, wax and paper

 

IMG_1194

Child's Hand Saw

Child’s Hand Saw

Makita Drill

Makita Drill

Studio Hammer

Studio Hammer

 

lukeshalan.com

 

 

 

Dave Hardy

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Dave Hardy lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. To see more of his work click here.