Catherine Lauigan

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Catherine Lauigan is a multidisciplinary artist working in L.A. Her work is varied, including working with fibers, sound, and photography. It ranges from more sculptural pieces using slabs to working with natural dyes and tone dispersals.

To see more from Catherine Lauigan click here.

LPP in Conversation: Scott Vermeire

In Conversation

LPP in Conversation visits Bay Area artists in their studios and project sites to explore the research, readings, obsessions, and inspiration they use to inform their practice.

In our fifth video series we talk with Scott Vermeire. Go to Art Practical to watch the full video!

Scott Vermeire’s practice hovers in a performative space between art and comedy. His abilities as a deadpan performer allow him to create characters that are absurd, threatening, and hilarious, while earnestly exploring what it means to be evil, to be a failure, to be desperate, or to experience self-defeat. Although some comedic practices, sketch comedy for example, might draw characters in quick, archetypal strokes, Scott’s commitment to personifying the characters he imagines leads to surprising, moving encounters with his audience.

Crescioni

crescioni

Crescioni is a line of accessories rooted in traditional craft techniques, handmade in California and inspired by the spirit of the American west.  To see more, click here.

 

Carolyn Salas

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*images from artists website

“New York based artist Carolyn Salas’ sculptural works investigate the tension between the physical and psychological space. Cement, plaster, ceramics, found objects, photography, and fabric are brought together with laborious craft to reveal human imperfections that are reflective of our everyday burdens, failures and achievements. Carolyn Salas received her BFA from The College of Santa Fe and her MFA from Hunter College. Selected exhibitions include: Urbis, The City Center, UK, Gallery Zidoun, Luxembourg, Art Space, CT, Parisian Laundry, QC, the Berkshire Museum, MA, Torrance Art Museum, CA, and the Santa Barbara Contemporary Arts Forum, CA.” -Dimensions Variable

To see more from Carolyn Salas click here.

María Aparicio Puentes

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María Aparicio Puentes was born in Santiago de Chile, where she is based now. She studied Architecture at the University of Chile and received her Master in Urban Design: Art, City, Society from University of Barcelona, Spain in 2011.

Collaborating with photographers,  Puentes sews geometric shapes directly onto their images, emphasizing spatial relationships and lending each photo a new focus in the process.

To see more of Maria’s work, please visit her website.

Fabienne Lasserre

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Fabienne Lasserre grew up in Montreal, Canada, and lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

To see more from Fabienne Lasserre click here.

Jessica Simorte

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Jessica Simorte is an artist based in Kansas City- to see more of her work, click here.

Joseph Pintz

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Joseph Pintz’s functional and sculptural ceramic work explores the role that domestic objects play in fulfilling our physical and emotional needs. Inspired by his Midwestern roots, Pintz creates mundane forms based on utilitarian vessels and other implements associated with the hand. In the process, the dense meaning of these objects is transferred into clay. Pintz earned his BA in anthropology and urban studies at Northwestern University.  After receiving his MFA from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, he was a resident artist at the Archie Bray Foundation. He has received the NCECA Emerging Artist Award as well as the Individual Excellence Award from the Ohio Arts Council. He is currently on research leave from the University of Missouri while working at the Roswell Artist-in-Residence program.

To see more of Pintz’s work, click here.

 

Now Featuring Hannah Carr

Hannah Carr’s work might be best thought of as a form of tableaux, a composition that might be an image, but still relates to inhabitable, rearrangeable space in our imaginations. She flips between clean color fields and the unwieldiness of sculpture , populating abstract collages with human figures, and adorning real, embodied space in superflat forms.

Exclusive Print, Stage 1

Exclusive Print, Stage 1

Exclusive Print, Stage 2

Exclusive Print, Stage 2

Exclusive Print, Stage 3

Exclusive Print, Stage 3

Exclusive Print, Limbo

Exclusive Print, Limbo

MH: Can you talk about your collage and sculpture materials? I’m interested in the way the colors and textures you use can play with our sense of 2D and 3D space, flattening the sculptural or tricking us into seeing depth in something flat.

1 Infinite Loop Postcard, Sculpey Scan, 2015

1 Infinite Loop Postcard, Sculpey Scan, 2015

HC: Initially I started using collage as a sketching mechanism to plan out future installations. I started thinking of the collages as my own imaginary stage sets. This mindset let me move around the paper cutouts in space like miniature props, using the paper as a stand in for three dimensional objects. I began scanning small clay objects and printing them out to include in the collage. Scanning has become a way for me to reprocess materials and explore different ways of flattening imagery.

Wiggle Room, 2013

Wiggle Room, 2013

MH: You use the body in a lot of your work, like your wearable installation. Would you talk about where that came from? How do you think about performative bodies in your work, and a viewer’s body’s experience of the work?

HC: The body has always been an important part of how I think about and experience artwork. I grew up dancing, and feel like that definitely influenced how I learned to interact with objects and the space around me. Using the body in installations gives the viewer a certain entry point to the imaginary world that I’m trying to create.

 Mirage, 2013

Mirage, 2013

Body Collage 1

Body Collage 1

I think about this similarly in image making. When I see the figure in an image, it lets me think about that space in relationship to my own body. I’m very inspired by set design, specifically works by Busby Berkeley and Alejandro Jodorowsky. Pee Wee’s Playhouse is another huge inspiration. These flattened, cartoonish sets exemplify the strangeness that happens when a real body interacts with a fully created environment.

Inspiration: Still from I Only Have Eyes for You, Busby Berkeley

Inspiration: Still from I Only Have Eyes for You, Busby Berkeley

MH: It looks like you’ve been influenced by fashion and the way an outfit or collection can pull together tons of associations to produce something new but recognizable. What’s your background?  If it’s not part of your earlier work, how did you end up incorporating some of the techniques of fashion in your own work?

HC: Coming from a background in fiber art, I have always made clothing and find a lot of technical satisfaction in the process of making a garment. I designed a collection for a local fashion show in Kansas City in 2013. I had always wanted to stay far away from the “fashion world,” but that experience made me reconsider making clothing and its different applications. Functional things started becoming more important to me and I wanted to somehow incorporate them into my artwork. I started thinking of garments as another mark in an image or installation. This, in turn made the body more prominent in the work.

Wearable Installation, 2013

Wearable Installation, 2013

High Five, collaboration with Brittany Ficken, 2014

High Five, collaboration with Brittany Ficken, 2014

My senior thesis show was a collaboration with Brittany Ficken. We created a collection of sculptural objects, garments, and images that were displayed simultaneously in a gallery space. It was a performative event, models entered the space wearing garments and objects that were removed and installed in the gallery. We thought a lot about blurring the lines of functional and non-functional, and raising questions about the hierarchy formed between art and everyday objects. Since that show, I’ve started printing my collage work onto fabric for garments and accessories. I feel like both sides of my practice are constantly informing each other.

Collage for Textile, 2013

Collage for Textile, 2013

Digitally Printed Clutch, 2013

Digitally Printed Clutch, 2013

This June I am designing for the West 18th Street Fashion show with another friend and collaborator Mariah Gillespie under our brand name, TWO. Our online shop will launch June 14th at www.shoptwo.cool.

High Five, collaboration with Brittany Ficken, 2014

High Five, collaboration with Brittany Ficken, 2014

Selma van Panhuis

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Selma van Panhuis (born 1980 in Winterswijk, The Netherlands)
studied Cultural Studies at the Erasmus University in Rotterdam,
Fine Arts at the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hague and a
Postgraduate in Painting at the Academy of Visual Arts in Leipzig.

Currently she lives and works in Leipzig.

To see more of the artist’s work, please visit her website.