Charlie O’Geen and Frank Fantauzzi at Volume Gallery

Charlie O’Geen and Frank Fantauzzi at Volume Gallery

Charlie O’Geen and Frank Fantauzzi at Volume Gallery

On Sept 27, 2012 O’Geen and Fantauzzi traveled 1,400 kilometers over 14 hours to Chicago upon completion of Hollow at RAW Gallery in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Engaging in a stream of conversation analyzing projects, past and future they arrived at Volume Gallery, immersed themselves in the space, and began to analyze the architecture. Like any building, 845 West Washington has had many lives; originally built to house automobiles, now galleries and creative practices, the space has hosted several bodies of energy.

Through O’Geen and Fantauzzi’s investigation of the site, they encourage the viewer to observe the building’s earliest components while simultaneously creating a new architectural language. Combined with exhuming the building’s past, O’Geen and Fantazzi will construct new environments utilizing building materials that call into question its prior lives and our relationship to the space.

The themes addressed in Dizzy are congruent to O’Geen and Fantauzzi’s practices, exploring structure, material and the impact of occupation. The work enlists a simple tire as metaphor for the body, the brick and the building unit. The installation (Dizzy) is about measuring these bodies and making them visually apparent.

**The images and text are from Volume Gallery

Brookes Boswell

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Born out of the great millinery tradition of New York City, Brookes Boswell Millinery was founded in 2009. Brookes Boswell started her studio after an apprenticeship with one of the city’s longtime milliners. Her background in architectural design, fine art and textiles, give Brookes a keen eye for precision, a love of fine materials and an appreciation for the construction techniques used in the trade.

The studio produces hats and accessories that mix functional detailing with a classic aesthetic. Each piece is meticulously crafted. Made-to-measure or custom, all items are individually constructed and made with only high quality materials.

 

To see more of Boswell’s stunning millinery or to pick up a chapeau for yourself, click here.

Now Featuring Matthew Conradt

Artist Matthew Conradt painstakingly reconfigures familiar feeling photographs into new, uncomfortable images.  Obscuring context without erasing the patina of time and nostalgia, Conradt’s pictures push the question of emotional resonance forward, to unsettling effect.

Exclusive Print 1

Exclusive Print 1

Exclusive Print 2

Exclusive Print 2

Exclusive Print 3

Exclusive Print 3

MH: Can you talk about your personal connects to the history and culture you reference in your work? I am thinking about how you’ve referred to the Rust Belt as a formative geography.

MC: I grew up in the Midwest, south of Minneapolis.  The area attracted manufacturing jobs but I don’t think it lasted. I just remember it as a typical rural area that was getting left behind in the late ‘80s/early ‘90s.  In high school, meth swept through the area but I also ended up moving around the state a little bit. I think it just colored my perception of people and situations. When I first moved from painting to making collages most of my subject matter had to do with this post-industrial America. I was also reading a lot of books and looking at a lot of artwork that talked about this as well.

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MH: How do you source the images you work with?  Are you working in collage or a mix of methods?  What’s it like being based in New York and working with images of spaces and places that are somewhere else? 

MC: My work is primarily collages, but they are photo transferred onto Mylar. I still see them as paintings or as mono prints so I want them to have a somewhat consistent surface to the pieces, through layering and other means. I like the photos to be from in the physical world, so I usually take from The New York Times or other printed newspapers or old magazines, like Architectural Digest, although I still grab some images from the internet. For the most part, I take images that I either find interesting or have to do with something I have been thinking about. I don’t really think of the images as being from somewhere else, more as a symbol for some idea that is being put out, that I then repurpose.

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MH: Do you work in series?  If so, do you plan it out or does a phase of working happen organically?

MC: Not really, I just work on pieces and obviously there are themes or imagery that follows through many of them but I wouldn’t call it working in a series. It happens pretty organically.

MH: What kind of symbols and ideas are you hunting for when you collect source images?  Are they tied to any particular time or history?

MC: In general, I am looking for contemporary images that seem to be communicating more than what their purpose for being printed lets on. I then tend to gravitate to images that have more history to them because they generally convey more. I am especially interested in images that might accidentally (or not) push out an idea about how you should be viewing them or what your relationship to the depicted image should be.

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MH: What projects are you working on right now?  Anything you’re gearing up to tackle, or have been thinking over?

MC: I am preparing for another solo show in the spring at Muriel Guepin Gallery. There are a few new process-based things I am trying to work out for my most recent pieces, which may or may not ever see the light of day.  Also, someone recommended I read about Guy Debord’s Society of the Spectacle and so I have been reading that, as well as other relevant books. Without getting into it too much, I don’t necessarily agree with a number of the ideas or conclusions and a lot of the terminology are too vague or undefined but I think I am getting a lot out of learning about it anyway.  He describes society as fixated on something like a mass of swirling images that mediates a relationship between the public and their sense of self in society. That, I think, would have some obvious appeal for any artist.

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MH: How do you think masking/covering up functions in your work?  The images are so luminous, but in several of them at least, something large an heavy obscure the center of the image.

MC: Yeah, I do that a lot, I don’t really know entirely what that’s about. I know Manet would intentionally leave “blind spots” in the middle of some of his paintings, I think it’s in order to keep your focus out of the middle of the image so your eye moves about it. I don’t know though, I think, maybe this is just me, that to obliterate the middle of an image is some kind of contempt for the initial image I appropriated.

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Sam Howell’s “The Attic” Lookbook

The Attic is a debut collection by fashion designer Sam Howell, who is currently based in San Francisco.

“The Attic aims to expose the extraordinary in the mundane with a little help from that trunk in the attic, salvaging the opulence of the old to create something fresh. Whether debutante or destitute, this collection celebrates women who never stop playing dress up.”

 

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Photography by Shelbie Dimond.

 

 

Hannah Jordan

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21 year old creative, recently graduated from multimedia textile design at Chelsea College of Art. Hannah Jordan’s  practice develops materials such as wood, plaster, acrylic, metal and uses the context and concept to inspire the forms of her objects.

To see more click here. 

Anna-Bella Papp

Anna-Bella Papp

Anna-Bella Papp

Anna-Bella Papp will be showing at Nasher Sculpture Center from October 24, 2014 through January 18, 2015.

Continuing its Sightings series of installations and architectural interventions by contemporary artists, the Nasher Sculpture Center will present the work of Romanian-born artist Anna-Bella Papp. Sightings: Anna-Bella Papp will be on view at the Nasher Sculpture Center’s Corner Gallery from October 24, 2014 through January 18, 2015.
Anna-Bella Papp makes exquisitely restrained works in unfired clay. Occupying tabletops or mounted to walls, the sculpted reliefs are intimate in scale yet suggest objects and spaces many times their scale. Many of the works recall low-relief architectural models or site plans for minimalist earthworks. They also call to mind modernist reliefs by artists as diverse as Jean Arp, Alberto Giacometti, and Ben Nicholson. Although relatively flat, the works are resolutely sculptural, often worked on both faces and even at times their edges. In this spare, rectangular format, subtle inflections and minor surface articulations take on surprising power. Papp harnesses this extraordinary economy of means to moving effect. Born in Romania in 1988 and currently living and working in Rome, Papp’s Sighting’s exhibition at the Nasher Sculpture Center will be the first museum presentation of her work in the United States.

**All images and italicized text is from Nasher Sculpture Center

Caroline Rose Kaufman

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Caroline Rose Kaufman graduated from Pratt Institute in 2014.  Her graduate collection featured her whimsical illustrations as prints, chunky pom poms, crochet detailing and a mustard yellow KNIT bomber jacket.  What’s not to love?

 

To see more of her work, click here.

Annie Strachan

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Annie Strachan lives and works in London. Her work has been exhibited throughout the UK and in Vienna. She uses a range of materials in her work from ceramics and self adhesive vinyl to found objects and fabric.  Annie makes sculptures sometimes described as totemic structures because of the way they are constructed.

To see more from Annie click here. 

Twice Studio

Twice is an art direction and graphic design studio based in Paris created by Fanny Le Bras and Clémentine Berry.

 

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Identity for Design Parade 9

Identity for Design Parade 9

 

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Art direction and graphic design for Lea Peckre x Maison Lejaby. Photography by Harley Weir.

Art direction and graphic design for Lea Peckre x Maison Lejaby. Photography by Harley Weir.

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Identity for the Architectures pour l'avenir exhibition

Identity for the Architectures pour l’avenir exhibition

 

Greeting card design for Centre National des Arts Plastiques

Greeting card design for Centre National des Arts Plastiques

 

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Poster and program design for La Gaîté Lyrique

Poster and program design for La Gaîté Lyrique

 

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Visual Identity for Baleapop 4 Festival, with Pop U Up set design.  Photo by Audrey Teichmann,  Hervé Padrino, and Simon Noizat.

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Art and editorial direction for Contraintes #1 Les Tactiques de Chronos.  In collaboration with Romuald Roudier Théron.

Art and editorial direction for Contraintes #1 Les Tactiques de Chronos. In collaboration with Romuald Roudier Théron.

 

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Poster Series for Jan Van Eyck Academie Workshops & conferences.

Poster Series for Jan Van Eyck Academie Workshops & conferences.

 

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Posters & flyers for the Ateliers de Paris open house day.

Posters & flyers for the Ateliers de Paris open house day.

 

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Exhibition at the International Festival of Poster & Graphic Design, Chaumont, 2011. In collaboration with Thomas Weil & Romuald Roudier Théron

Exhibition at the International Festival of Poster & Graphic Design, Chaumont, 2011. In collaboration with Thomas Weil & Romuald Roudier Théron

**All images are from www.wearetwice.com

Ben Sanders

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Ben Sanders is an artist from Los Angeles born in 1989. He lives and works in L.A.
He also founded a collective called Those People.

To see more from Ben Sanders click here.