Norman Zammitt

Norman Zammitt

Norman Zammitt

The work of Norman Zammitt. These paintings were shown last December at Carter & Citizen.

Carter & Citizen is proud to present an exhibition of paintings by Norman Zammitt (1931 – 2007). The exhibition opens October 27 and closes December 15, 2012. The gallery will host a reception on Saturday, October 27, from 6 to 8pm.

This exhibition highlights a group of small paintings executed in the 1970s by Norman Zammitt, a pioneer of the Light and Space movement in Southern California. Though largely under-appreciated during his lifetime, Zammittʼs work has recently been reconsidered, due in large part to The Gettyʼs Pacific Standard Time initiative.
Zammitt was intently focused with the consideration of colors effect on each other and how light penetrates and emanates from color. His linear geometric abstractions were approached in a rigorous scientific manner, as he worked with physicists and mathematicians to perfect his formula for blending acrylics. This precise approach is easily forgotten when looking at the paintings, as their ethereal and nuanced surfaces mesmerize the viewer. Simply put, these paintings reward the act of looking.

This exhibition was initially conceived in collaboration with Joni Gordon (1936 – 2012) of Newspace Resales (Los Angeles). Gordon was a fierce champion of Zammitt and the current reexamination of Zammittʼs work is in no small part due to Joniʼs efforts. In part, this exhibition serves as a billet-doux to both Zammitt and Gordon, whose visions were authentic and original; a way of looking, creating and being that defies the cynicism and conceptual heavy-handedness often seen in art today.

Norman Zammitt (1931–2007) was born in Toronto, Canada, raised on an American Indian reservation in New York State, and moved to California with his family in 1945. He studied at Pasadena City College and went on to earn his MFA at Otis Art Institute in 1961, where he created collages and abstract paintings inspired by the landscape. In 1964 Zammitt turned from oil paint to acrylic plastic resin, producing box-like sculptures that explored color and transparency. By the early 1970s, he returned to painting, continuing his investigations of color relationships through precisely rendered striped paintings. Zammittʼs mathematical color combinations produce the illusion of deep dimensionality and dramatic optical effects. Zammittʼs painting North Wall (1977) was included in The Gettyʼs Pacific Standard Time exhibition in 2011.

**All text and images are from carterandcitizen.com

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